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Happy St. Patrick’s Day- FREE PATTERN

Top O’ The Mornin’ To Ya!  (I just looked up different St. Patrick’s Day sayings and came out somewhat empty handed. Thanks Google…)

 

Happy St. Patrick’s day!  As I sat in the car this morning before work, I realized that I had walked out the door without any green today… Thankfully, I had a green hair-tie in my car, but does that really count? We could get into the nitty-gritty, or I could share with you a fun, green pattern.  Let’s get to it, and hopefully it will make up for my lack of green wardrobe.

pic.jpg

You can mix and match your fabric or use all the same.

 

Prep:

Dig in your stash for green and cream fabric. Or whatever floats your fancy.

 

You will need:

1/4 yard of green {clover fabric}

1/4 yard of tan/cream {background fabric}

One fat quarter {backing}

One fat quarter of batting

Two 2” strips {binding}

*You could also use mix and match your fabric as I did.*
 

Chopping Block:

Cut two 2.5” strips of clover fabric.

Now, cut 24 2.5” squares from the clover strips.

Cut two 2.5” strips of background fabric.

Now, cut 32 2.5” squares from the background strips.

Depending on the width of your fabric, you might need three 2.5” strips.

*Note: If you are unable to get the full 34 squares from these strips, you could also cut down the scraps in the next step to get the remaining squares.

Cut one 3” strip of clover fabric.

Cut this into four 3” squares.

*If you were unable to cut all your squares earlier, use the scrap from this step to cut the remaining squares.

Cut one 3” strip of background fabric.

Cut this into four 3” squares.

*If you were unable to cut all your squares earlier, use the scrap from this step to cut the remaining squares.

 

 

Stitchin’ Time:

pic 2

For this step you will be using the 3” squares of background fabric and 3″ squares of clover fabric.

Take one of each square and place them right sides together. Draw a diagonal line from corner to corner.

pic 3

Now sew a quarter inch on both sides of this line.

pic 4

Repeat for all 3” squares.

Cut along the line you drew and press seam.

pic 5

 

Trim these down to 2.5” squares.

You should end with eight half square triangle squares.

 

Assemble your block using the diagram.  Once assembled decide whether you want a stem or not.  It is personal preference.  I decided to add one using a scrap from an earlier step.  To attach it to my quilt I sewed lines through the stem multiple times.  I wanted it to look like veins on a leaf or stem, but also to be something fairly simple.  There are no rules here, just have fun and make it your own.

clover pic

pic 8

If you press your seams opposite directions for each row, it will be much easier to next each corner and patch your points.

pic 20

When the top is complete create the quilting sandwich:

Backing fat quarter—Batting fat quarter—Quilt top

pic 16

Pin, spray baste, or thread baste the sandwich so you can quilt it together.

 

Quilt however you desire: stitch in the ditch, horizontal lines, meander, the options are endless.

pic 17

After quilted, trim edges and attach binding.

Finish by sewing the binding, and you will have a completed clover mini quilt.

Finished size: 16.5″ x 16.5″.

 

 

Instructions Without Pictures:

LUCKY, LUCKY

Prep:

Dig in your stash for green and cream fabric. Or whatever floats your fancy.

 

You will need:

1/4 yard of green {clover fabric}

1/4 yard of tan/cream {background fabric}

One fat quarter {backing}

One fat quarter of batting

Two 2” strips {binding}

*You could also use mix and match your fabric as I did.*
Chopping Block:

Cut two 2.5” strips of clover fabric.

Now, cut 24 2.5” squares from the clover strips.

Cut two 2.5” strips of background fabric.

Now, cut 32 2.5” squares from the background strips.

Depending on the width of your fabric, you might need three 2.5” strips.

*Note: If you are unable to get the full 34 squares from these strips, you could also cut down the scraps in the next step to get the remaining squares.

Cut one 3” strip of clover fabric.

Cut this into four 3” squares.

*If you were unable to cut all your squares earlier, use the scrap from this step to cut the remaining squares.

Cut one 3” strip of background fabric.

Cut this into four 3” squares.

*If you were unable to cut all your squares earlier, use the scrap from this step to cut the remaining squares.

 

Stitchin’ Time:

For this step you will be using the 3” squares of background fabric and 3″ squares of clover fabric.

Take one of each square and place them right sides together. Draw a diagonal line from corner to corner.

Now sew a quarter inch on both sides of this line.

Repeat for all 3” squares.

Cut along the line you drew and press seam.

Trim these down to 2.5” squares.

You should end with eight half square triangle squares.

clover pic

Assemble your block using the diagram.  Once assembled decide whether you want a stem or not.  It is personal preference.  I decided to add one using a scrap from an earlier step.  To attach it to my quilt I sewed lines through the stem multiple times.  I wanted it to look like veins on a leaf or stem, but also to be something fairly simple.  There are no rules here, just have fun and make it your own.

 

When the top is complete create the quilting sandwich:

Backing fat quarter—Batting fat quarter—Quilt top

Pin, spray baste, or thread baste the sandwich so you can quilt it together.

Quilt however you desire: stitch in the ditch, horizontal lines, meander, the options are endless

After quilted, trim edges and attach binding.

Finish by sewing the binding, and you will have a completed clover mini quilt.

Finished size: 16.5″ x 16.5″.

 

 

 

 

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

See you at the machine,

  • Care

 

apqs · Challenge · Design · Longarm · Millennium · Millie · Pattern · Quilt · Quilting · Quilting with Care · Sewing · Uncategorized · Work in Progress

Flying Away On Fabric

Does life seem like it is flying away without you? I sure feel that way some days. 

I’ve been working on a new quilt and pattern that has me flying with the fabric. It is an airplane block that I have been messing with different sizing, trying to come up with the “perfect” size of each section in the block. I have a certain little one in mind for an airplane quilt, so hopefully I am able to finish this up quickly. 

For now, I have been practicing and playing with scrap fabric. I never really understood the desire for mini quilts, but I am beginning to jump on board. Some of these trial blocks are just too cute to adios. I’m thinking they might get quilted up and turn into minis. I’m sure I can find a few homes for them.

What have you been working on?
Ever since we unboxed Millie, I have been dying to get my hands on her at every available moment. Keep in mind, Millie is at my parent’s house which is a little under an hour away from where I live. That doesn’t stop me. I spent most of last weekend standing behind her, and I even went up last night to get in a couple hours of playtime. 

This weekend, my mom and I are taking a two day quilt path class. Quilt Path is the computer system that APQS offers for their longarm machines. I expect to walk away with my mind blown. Hopefully I will be able to pick up the pieces and learn everything I can. Gosh I just cannot wait.

I will be sure to share different tricks and tips we learn. Sharing this journey from cutting the tape on the box to learning how to use Millie is something I plan to do.  I am planning on posting the good, the bad, and the ugly and dragging you along with me. Strap on that seatbelt, things could get crazy around here.
For now I will dream of flying away to a land of no clocks, no commitments, happy sewing machines, and full bobbins. Care to join me?

See you at the machine,

Care

Challenge · Design · Pattern · Quilt · Quilting with Care · Sewing · Uncategorized · Work in Progress

Speed Bumps and Seam Rippers

Do you ever plan to have a sew day but spend more time taking seams out than putting them in?  

This was how my day went yesterday. I’m working on a design-as-you-go quilt that I’m trying to finish up. The problem with these quilts is I usually spend quite a long time with my seam ripper. 

 

It’s often worth it in the end, but my goodness I think it’s time I name my seam ripper and make this relationship Facebook official. After all, we did spend many hours together all weekend, I have one favorite seam ripper, and after much practice, I know the easiest way to use it. If we aren’t in a relationship, it deserves a name at least. I’m taking suggestions! 

 

The quilt I struggled with this weekend has been an unfinished project for quite some time. You see, I hit a speed bump. I ginormous speed bump that was acting more like a dead end than something I could just slowly climb over. (I never said I wasn’t dramatic 🙂 ) 

Running out of bobbin with two inches left

I had accidentally cut a block wrong and ran out of fabric at the same time. At that point (along with many other things not going quite right) I removed the remaining blocks from my design walk to be tackled another day. Sometimes I realize when a project isn’t happening, and it’s not worth fighting through to hate the end result. 

 

Fast forward many months and it’s back on my wall. In the time it was away in hiding I had purchased new fabric that matched well, and I was able to sew up a replacement block today. 

 

When I started playing with this quilt, I wasn’t planning on having any of the diamond pinwheel blocks. I was only trying to make the pinwheel with white squares in the middle. However, I used my favorite ruler by Cindy Casciato (available here) and it made mirror images of every block. Instead of only using half the blocks I sewed, I came up with a Plan B (which was really probably Plan P but who is keeping track). I decided to turn the mirror images blocks into a pinwheel set on point. 


This led to needing to set the blocks and now another challenge was created- the diamond blocks are larger than my original blocks. 
I sure love to design as I go but it is not without those speed bumps. Thank goodness for four wheel drive. 

The newest challenge is not too big and borders around the smaller blocks will do the trick. 

 

I’m running out of room to store unfinished projects and I would much rather be looking for more room to store finished quilts. Hopefully I can leave my seam ripper alone and actually finish this quilt. 
See you at the machine, 

Care

{You might bring your seam ripper too.}

Antique · Challenge · Design · Finished Project · Finished Quilt · Pattern · Quilt · Quilting with Care · Sewing · Treasure · Uncategorized · Work in Progress

Patterns & Treasures

I’ve had many friends describe quilts they are wanting to make and I have worked up a quick how-to for them. I’ve done it on old envelopes, a paper towel, scrap paper, the computer, and graph paper. Taking into consideration their skill level, I have scribbled down pictures, diagrams and instructions for them to use, but never something for public viewing; until yesterday. Yesterday I nervously, marched myself into a print shop and printed my first pattern made for a public eye. Today I dropped that pattern into a big blue mailbox for it to face a stranger. We will see what happens.

Last night, thinking of all the things I could’ve, should’ve, would’ve done on the pattern, I was sent a picture. Growing up there was a lady who was like an extra grandma and had the brightest smile and sweetest soul. As her daughter was going through a few boxes, a treasure was found.


This picture is of a 1910 Dresden Plate quilt pattern. I cannot even believe this still exists and that it is in pretty great shape. What I find most unbelievable is how anyone actually made their quilt using this. I do not understand the pattern at all, but I am going to do more research and try figuring it out. This treasure will be framed and admired for years to come. Maybe in one of those years I will figure out how they expected the pattern to be used. Do you have any insight??

I’ve actually made a Dresden Plate quilt before. I, however, did not use this pattern.


I hope you enjoy and relish in the fact that our patterns are no longer what they were but that does not mean old patterns don’t have to be a thing of the past. Patterns may be easier to follow and use modern tools, rulers, and often sewing machines that were not around then, but something about the simplicity of hand sewing is relaxing. Thinking of the stories and laughter that surrounded this pattern years ago brings happiness and wonder.
See you at the machine,

Care

Challenge · Design · Finished Project · Finished Quilt · Free Pattern · Pattern · Quilt · Quilting with Care · Sewing · Uncategorized

A Charmed Baby Quilt