Finished Project · Finished Quilt · Free Pattern · Pattern · Quilt · quilter's hideaway · Quilting · Quilting with Care · Sewing · Uncategorized

Happy St. Patrick’s Day- FREE PATTERN

Top O’ The Mornin’ To Ya!  (I just looked up different St. Patrick’s Day sayings and came out somewhat empty handed. Thanks Google…)

 

Happy St. Patrick’s day!  As I sat in the car this morning before work, I realized that I had walked out the door without any green today… Thankfully, I had a green hair-tie in my car, but does that really count? We could get into the nitty-gritty, or I could share with you a fun, green pattern.  Let’s get to it, and hopefully it will make up for my lack of green wardrobe.

pic.jpg

You can mix and match your fabric or use all the same.

 

Prep:

Dig in your stash for green and cream fabric. Or whatever floats your fancy.

 

You will need:

1/4 yard of green {clover fabric}

1/4 yard of tan/cream {background fabric}

One fat quarter {backing}

One fat quarter of batting

Two 2” strips {binding}

*You could also use mix and match your fabric as I did.*
 

Chopping Block:

Cut two 2.5” strips of clover fabric.

Now, cut 24 2.5” squares from the clover strips.

Cut two 2.5” strips of background fabric.

Now, cut 32 2.5” squares from the background strips.

Depending on the width of your fabric, you might need three 2.5” strips.

*Note: If you are unable to get the full 34 squares from these strips, you could also cut down the scraps in the next step to get the remaining squares.

Cut one 3” strip of clover fabric.

Cut this into four 3” squares.

*If you were unable to cut all your squares earlier, use the scrap from this step to cut the remaining squares.

Cut one 3” strip of background fabric.

Cut this into four 3” squares.

*If you were unable to cut all your squares earlier, use the scrap from this step to cut the remaining squares.

 

 

Stitchin’ Time:

pic 2

For this step you will be using the 3” squares of background fabric and 3″ squares of clover fabric.

Take one of each square and place them right sides together. Draw a diagonal line from corner to corner.

pic 3

Now sew a quarter inch on both sides of this line.

pic 4

Repeat for all 3” squares.

Cut along the line you drew and press seam.

pic 5

 

Trim these down to 2.5” squares.

You should end with eight half square triangle squares.

 

Assemble your block using the diagram.  Once assembled decide whether you want a stem or not.  It is personal preference.  I decided to add one using a scrap from an earlier step.  To attach it to my quilt I sewed lines through the stem multiple times.  I wanted it to look like veins on a leaf or stem, but also to be something fairly simple.  There are no rules here, just have fun and make it your own.

clover pic

pic 8

If you press your seams opposite directions for each row, it will be much easier to next each corner and patch your points.

pic 20

When the top is complete create the quilting sandwich:

Backing fat quarter—Batting fat quarter—Quilt top

pic 16

Pin, spray baste, or thread baste the sandwich so you can quilt it together.

 

Quilt however you desire: stitch in the ditch, horizontal lines, meander, the options are endless.

pic 17

After quilted, trim edges and attach binding.

Finish by sewing the binding, and you will have a completed clover mini quilt.

Finished size: 16.5″ x 16.5″.

 

 

Instructions Without Pictures:

LUCKY, LUCKY

Prep:

Dig in your stash for green and cream fabric. Or whatever floats your fancy.

 

You will need:

1/4 yard of green {clover fabric}

1/4 yard of tan/cream {background fabric}

One fat quarter {backing}

One fat quarter of batting

Two 2” strips {binding}

*You could also use mix and match your fabric as I did.*
Chopping Block:

Cut two 2.5” strips of clover fabric.

Now, cut 24 2.5” squares from the clover strips.

Cut two 2.5” strips of background fabric.

Now, cut 32 2.5” squares from the background strips.

Depending on the width of your fabric, you might need three 2.5” strips.

*Note: If you are unable to get the full 34 squares from these strips, you could also cut down the scraps in the next step to get the remaining squares.

Cut one 3” strip of clover fabric.

Cut this into four 3” squares.

*If you were unable to cut all your squares earlier, use the scrap from this step to cut the remaining squares.

Cut one 3” strip of background fabric.

Cut this into four 3” squares.

*If you were unable to cut all your squares earlier, use the scrap from this step to cut the remaining squares.

 

Stitchin’ Time:

For this step you will be using the 3” squares of background fabric and 3″ squares of clover fabric.

Take one of each square and place them right sides together. Draw a diagonal line from corner to corner.

Now sew a quarter inch on both sides of this line.

Repeat for all 3” squares.

Cut along the line you drew and press seam.

Trim these down to 2.5” squares.

You should end with eight half square triangle squares.

clover pic

Assemble your block using the diagram.  Once assembled decide whether you want a stem or not.  It is personal preference.  I decided to add one using a scrap from an earlier step.  To attach it to my quilt I sewed lines through the stem multiple times.  I wanted it to look like veins on a leaf or stem, but also to be something fairly simple.  There are no rules here, just have fun and make it your own.

 

When the top is complete create the quilting sandwich:

Backing fat quarter—Batting fat quarter—Quilt top

Pin, spray baste, or thread baste the sandwich so you can quilt it together.

Quilt however you desire: stitch in the ditch, horizontal lines, meander, the options are endless

After quilted, trim edges and attach binding.

Finish by sewing the binding, and you will have a completed clover mini quilt.

Finished size: 16.5″ x 16.5″.

 

 

 

 

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

See you at the machine,

  • Care

 

Challenge · Design · Finished Project · Finished Quilt · Free Pattern · Pattern · Quilt · quilter's hideaway · Quilting · Quilting with Care · Sewing · Uncategorized

VALENTINE’S DAY FREE PATTERN

It’s Valentine’s Day and I miss making a paper mailbox so my friends could drop a sweet valentine into it and the school parties… Oh how I miss those! Since I will be working, sitting in a bland cubicle all day and not acknowledging the holiday, I thought I would leave each of you a special valentine. I hope you enjoy it.

 

How about a quick and easy mini quilt filled with love.

 

Actually, I think that is what I will name this mini, “Filled With Love.” It is even simple enough to whip up quickly and have finished before the day ends. Let’s get to it.

 

You can mix and match fabric or use all the same.

 

Prep:

Dig in your stash for red/pink and cream fabric. Or whatever floats your fancy. Personally, I think this would look beyond cute in purples, but I’m a purple girl.

 

You will need:

1/4 yard of red {heart fabric}

1/4 yard of tan/cream {background fabric}

One fat quarter {backing}

One fat quarter of batting

Two 2.5” strips {binding}

*You could also use mix and match your fabric as I did.*
 

Chopping Block:

Cut two 2.5” strips of heart fabric. 

​Now, cut 20 2.5” squares from the heart strips.

Cut two 2.5” strips of background fabric. 

​Now, cut 34 2.5” squares from the background strips.  

Depending on the width of your fabric, you might need three 2.5” strips.

*Note: If you are unable to get the full 34 squares from these strips, you could also cut down the scraps in the next step to get the remaining squares.

Cut one 3” strip of heart fabric. 

​Cut this into five 3” squares.

*If you were unable to cut all your squares earlier, use the scrap from this step to cut the remaining squares.

Cut one 3” strip of background fabric. 

Cut this into five 3” squares.

*If you were unable to cut all your squares earlier, use the scrap from this step to cut the remaining squares.

 

Stitchin’ Time:

For this step you will be using the 3” squares of background fabric and 3″ saquares of heart fabric.

Take one of each square and place them right sides together. Draw a diagonal line from corner to corner.

Now sew a quarter inch on both sides of this line.  

 

Repeat for all 3” squares.

Cut along the line you drew and press seam. 

Trim these down to 2.5” squares. 

You should end with ten half square triangle squares. 

Assemble your block using the diagram.

 

 

When the top is complete create the quilting sandwich:

​Backing fat quarter—Batting fat quarter—Quilt top



Pin, spray baste, or thread baste the sandwich so you can quilt it together.

Quilt however you desire: stitch in the ditch, horizontal lines, meander, the options are endless

After quilted, trim edges and attach binding.

Finish by sewing the binding, and you will have a completed heart mini quilt.

 

Finished size: 16.5″ x 16.5″. 

Instructions Without Pictures: 

FILLLED WITH LOVE 

Prep:

Dig in your stash for red/pink and cream fabric. Or whatever floats your fancy. Personally, I think this would look beyond cute in purples, but I’m a purple girl.

 

You will need:

1/4 yard of red {heart fabric}

1/4 yard of tan/cream {background fabric}

One fat quarter {backing}

One fat quarter of batting

Two 2.5” strips {binding}

 

Chopping Block:

Cut two 2.5” strips of heart fabric. 

​Now, cut 20 2.5” squares from the heart strips.

Cut two 2.5” strips of background fabric. 

​Now, cut 34 2.5” squares from the background strips.  

Depending on the width of your fabric, you might need three 2.5” strips.

*Note: If you are unable to get the full 34 squares from these strips, you can cut down the scraps in the next step to get the remaining squares.

Cut one 3” strip of heart fabric

​Cut this into five 3” squares.

*If you were unable to cut all your squares earlier, use the scrap from this step to cut the remaining squares.

Cut one 3” strip of background fabric

​Cut this into five 3” squares.

*If you were unable to cut all your squares earlier, use the scrap from this step to cut the remaining squares.

 

Stitchin’ Time:

For this step you will be using the 3” squares of background fabric and heart fabric.

Take one of each square and place them right sides together. Draw a diagonal line from corner to corner.

Now sew a quarter inch on both sides of this line.   

Repeat for all 3” squares.
Cut along the line you drew and press seam.

Trim these down to 2.5” squares.

You should end with ten half square triangle squares.

Assemble your block using the diagram.

 

When the top is complete create the quilting sandwich:

​Backing fat quarter—Batting fat quarter—Quilt top

​Pin, spray baste, or thread baste the sandwich so you can quilt it together.

Quilt however you desire: stitch in the ditch, horizontal lines, meander, the options are endless

After quilted, trim edges and attach binding.

Finish by sewing the binding, and you will have a completed heart mini quilt.

Finished size: 16.5″ x 16.5″. 

Happy Valentine’s Day

See you at the machine, 

Care

applique · apqs · Finished Project · Finished Quilt · Quilt · quilter's hideaway · Quilting · Quilting with Care · Sewing

How to Sew Using a PlayStation and TV

I promise I haven’t lost my mind… yet. But I did recently borrow my husband’s PS4 for a sewing project. Don’t run away, yet. You can too!

As long as there is a gaming system with internet or even a smart TV in your house, this post will apply to you. Are you ready? It has to do with our favorite “A” word… applique.

I do not have a light box, and they are quite pricy since they are only something that would serve a small purpose in my world. I cannot justify the price for the amount of time I would be using it, but I still wanted to get away with appliqueing specific images using a similar technique. That is when I realized my TV could be my light box. Once I realized that, I just needed to figure out a way to pull my image up on the TV.

Forewarning—Your husband might get home from work after you have been working on said project and ask what you have done to the TV.  After all, a huge duck on the screen might be a little strange. I warned you…

Now, let’s get down to it. If you have an internet-ready gaming system or smart TV, you can access the internet-I used google- to search for your desired image. I’ve always wanted a rubber duck bathroom, and it is happening now, so I needed a rubber duck quilt to hang on the wall (This might be the point I let you know that I have lost my mind…).

I found the place to search for a website through the PS4, I went to Google, and then typed in “Rubber Duck image.” Once I found the image, I needed to zoom in to get the right size for my quilt. This is where a larger TV might be needed depending on how large you’re wanting your applique piece. If you have a smaller-than-desired TV, you could continue in sections and move your fabric around. Although I was on a larger TV, my image was still not the size I wanted. I had to search, but to zoom in using a PS4, you click R3 (The right toggle button; press it down).

Once your image is ready, I carefully taped my fabric onto the TV, preferably the frame and not the actual screen, but I did need to lightly place a couple pieces of tape onto the screen. I am not reliable for any harmed TV’s while attempting this. Next, trace your image and continue with your desired applique method. You can trace the image onto freezer paper if you would rather not trace on your actual fabric. Also, keep in mind whether you need to attach your fusible interfacing first or if you are going to use that at all.

I was in a hurry, so I traced directly onto my fabric, cut the image out, and pinned like crazy until I knew my fabric wouldn’t move while I sewed it down.

I left the image on the TV until I had traced each piece of fabric. To clarify, I traced the entire outline in a yellow, feathered fabric. Then I put orange on the screen and traced the beak. Lastly, I placed a light yellow on the screen to trace the wing pieces. I also traced the different eye pieces.

This process worked well for my large applique piece. It might be more difficult to make it work for smaller pieces, though I think it would still be possible.

Now game systems aren’t just for the guys in our life (They never were, but we have more uses for them now!)


{For those of you who were guessing circles or bubbles from Instagram/Facebook, this duck has a bubbly personality!}

See you at the machine (or tracing at the TV),

Care



9 DAYS UNTIL OPENING!! 


Design · Finished Project · Pattern · Quilt · quilter's hideaway · Quilting with Care · Sewing · Uncategorized

Can You Watch TV & Sew? 

Fun fact: I sew in silence. Occasionally I’ll listen to music, but mostly I sew without any noise except for the sewing machine. It’s my favorite way of losing myself and diving into a project. 

Last night while working on finishing up a table runner, My Love decided I needed to watch a movie, the new Dolly movie, on the tv. It wasn’t even 5 minutes later before I found myself sitting on the floor staring at the tv. Not much of anything was accomplished as soon as the tv was turned on. 
Now I know why I sew in silence, without distractions. 

Thankfully I only get this reaction with the tv. I can sew with friends and have music playing but goodness there is something up with the tv. 

I have come to the realization that it is DECEMBER first. Is anyone else freaking out? How can this be? 

My to do list is a mile long, but I’m chugging onwards and slowly marking things off. The problem is, I mark one thing off and add three more. 

Is anyone else in the same place? Piled high with Christmas projects and always adding more. I wouldn’t want it any other way though. I love making handmade gifts and there is nothing like laying on the couch under a quilt. 

Well, I better get back to sewing. Soon we will be having sew nights and parties at QH where all we will be able to hear is chatter and machines. It will be lovely, I cannot wait! 

See you at the machine, 

Care

apqs · Challenge · Design · Finished Quilt · Longarm · Millennium · Millie · Pattern · Quilt · Quilting · Quilting with Care · Sewing · Uncategorized

Standing at the Start Line

Everyone has to have a starting point. This is mine.

 

Not that long ago I wrote a blog post about us opening some very special boxes. Once we assembled our Millie, I spend almost every waking moment wanting to sew with her.

This weekend, I was able to take a two day class on quilt path, Millie’s brain/computer quilting system. There was so much information and I am very tired, but I have 20 pages of notes to hopefully pull me through and remember everything that was said.
img_4168

It was an incredible class that was both informational and fun. It also left my mind wandering to new quilt ideas and more projects (because we all need more of those, right?). Saturday’s class started at 9am and we dove right in. When class ended around 5pm I just wanted to jump behind the machine and apply many of the skills we had learned in simulation mode during class.

After class I drove straight to my parents house, loaded my first actual quilt, not just pieces of fabric sandwiched together, and got to work. Nerves were high as I leaned in to push the SEW button, but everything functioned fairly well.
There was a bobbin change, a thread break, safe zone areas to set, patterns to resize, repeat, and nest, and so much more.  I think I might need a checklist to remember the common steps for the next few quilts.

My weakest area is either setting the numbers for pattern sizes and thinking through that aspect of the loading process, or the last partial row at the bottom of a quilt. This row was causing a few challenges last night while quilting.

I thought I just had a problem with my pattern or a setting. I wasn’t sure, so after finishing my first quilt I loaded a second– determined to figure out what was happening.
I should clarify that the problem I was having was manually working through the jumps and a system error between the computer and the machine. There may have also been a few errors with the users brain. It happens. It was still sewing fine, occasionally there would be a thread break sensor go off when the thread was fine or it would start tracing a pattern when it was supposed to be sewing.  With each issue I was able to back it up and restart at the stitch the problem started on without changing the end result of the quilt.

With the second quilt loaded, a pattern imported, and settings seemingly happy I dove in. Unfortunately I had the same issues on the second quilt as I had with the first.
Thankfully, when I returned to class today I was able to ask a handful of questions and come up with a game plan on trouble shooting to find an answer. No matter what, she still sews beautifully and I can work around this hiccup manually instead of automatically for now.

I am just so thrilled with how each quilt turned out. I love watching Millie sew and thinking through how to enhance different quilts with different quilting designs and concepts. It opens an entire new element to quilting.
Sew you at the machine,

•Care
apqs · Challenge · English Paper Piecing · EPP · Longarm · Millennium · Millie · Quilt · Quilting · Quilting with Care · Sewing · Uncategorized · WIP week · Work in Progress

Millie Hums

We went on vacation this last week and I completely checked out on technology. It was wonderful, but I am happy to be back!

I missed WIP Week for this month, but I did spend some time working on an unfinished project. I hope you did too! See my last post for more about my WIP Project. It was an English Paper Pieced quilt designed by Mickey Depre (Her patterns are fabulous!).

img_3374

We flew back home late Friday night and yesterday (Saturday) I spent on a date with Millie. If you remember, we had a few boxes delivered the week before I left town. Those boxes turned into an amazing, APQS longarm machine. I AM IN LOVE! Sorry My Love, you might have a little competition.

img_3284

Back to Millie- Her full name has turned into Millennium Falcon thanks to one of my awesome Brother-in-Law’s suggestions. For short, we will still call her Millie. The week before we left I was able to get her all assembled, we plugged her in, saw lights turn on, then I had to leave and drive back to my house. This was so tough! It was just before midnight when we saw her lights turn on, so we were not able to actually hear her hum.

The week was crazy and I wasn’t able to get back to her before leaving town. Thankfully, I had a great distraction-Disney World. Though I would be lying if I said I didn’t think about sewing with her every day.

Back to yesterday. Yesterday I finally got to not only turn her on and hear her hum!

At first, I loaded on a couple fat quarters to check tension and play with settings on QuiltPath, the computer program she is able to work with and we have conveniently named “Millie’s Brain”. Here is what we came up with.

After this was finished, I decided to work with a larger area and loaded a little over a yard top and a backing then played more. This time I didn’t have a plan and just wanted to try different things.

I wasn’t looking up tutorials or spending too much time fighting through settings because I am taking a two-day class next weekend. This was just a time to get my hands dirty.

The first row I was hoping to alternate a teddy bear and crosshatching. Everything went well for the teddy bear, then it moved to do the crosshatching, but instead of making a jump, it sewed the transition line. “It is just a test piece,” I reminded myself, though I was already looking for a seam ripper to mend this mistake. On the next jump from crosshatch to teddy bear I thought I could trick it and stop her right after finishing the crosshatch then move it to the start of teddy bear and search for closest stitch. In theory it sounded like a fabulous idea, but in action it just didn’t work. I moved along to a new row.

Another issue I came across was that sometimes after starting a block, setting the safe areas and where the block should sew, Millie would move through the pattern, but wasn’t stitching. I was able to jump in the middle of it and get her to start stitching again, but I couldn’t figure out how to back up and get her to fix what she missed.   I’m hoping to clear this up with a YouTube video or in class next weekend.

I’m very happy with how everything is going so far even with this learning curve. I’m glad I was able to start playing and come across these issues ahead of time.

After coming across a few issues I decided to take a stab at freehand quilting. I turned QuiltPath off and unlatched her from the belts to give me full control. Once ready, my mind went blank and I had no idea what to quilt. I started with a simple “hello!” and I forgot halfway through how to write cursive- brain fart!

fullsizerender

Next up I played with writing “Quilter’s Hideaway.” Remember that surprise I hinted at a few posts back? Here is another part of it. I’m going to let you slowly put pieces together as I share hints and clues.

img_4098

With that, I moved on to some meandering, straight lines, and a box. I also tried pebbles in a smaller box, but my goodness, this will need some work.

I hope you enjoy this journey with Millie. I cannot wait to continue learning and sharing along the way.  I already realize I will need to come up with a better option for getting pictures of the quilting.  Often it was hard to get the stitches to show up.

 

See you at the machine,

Care

Challenge · Design · Pattern · Quilt · Quilting with Care · Sewing · Uncategorized · Work in Progress

Supernova Sunset

Any chance you were wondering what I was sewing while sitting outside on the porch in Kentucky?

Well lucky you, read on to find out. 

We were learning how to make a Bargello quilt. A certain little sister said something along the lines of “you can make it in one weekend” and we were sold. Of course, this would require possibly reading the size of the quilt before deciding you could make it in one weekend. As it turns out, the quilt I started is a king size quilt (Actually a king size, not just something that feels ginormous. I promise, it is.). Obviously it was not finished in one weekend. It is far from finished. 

 
When I started pulling my fabric for this quilt I chose to use colors from Oklahoma sunsets and sunrises. I’ve always been enamored by the bright, brilliant colors that appear morning and night so I am mixing them into a quilt. 

 Once I had my fabric, I cut 2.5” strips of each. 


 

After all the strips were cut I lined them up using a drying rack and started piecing together my panel or strata. By midnight on Friday all my panels were ready to press. 


That is until I decided I didn’t like the way I had sewn on my three yellows. Another date with my handy-dandy seam ripper and I was back on track. Pressing happened and then I started the long, tedious process of cutting different widths to follow along the pattern grid. 


Once you have various strips cut, you take the rows at different points and reattach them or use different rows to create the pattern shown on the template. 

 A few strips in, I realized something was off with the bottom half pattern template. I have decided to focus only on the top half and then repeat the top half again since they are mirror image patterns (or should be). These things happen and it is still a wonderful pattern. I cannot wait to see the finished product. 


 

This was when I finally noticed my quilt was in fact going to be a king size quilt (notice the painters tape holding up rows outside of the design board I was using). I had a brief freak out moment and I thought I was going to stop or at least shorten my quilt, but I had made it this far, I might as well keep plowing through. 

When the weekend came to an end, I had all of my top half strips cut apart and resewn. Now, I just need to sew these strips together-that sounds easy enough. 

I am hoping I can finish this quilt soon and that it does not become one of my infinite number of my work in progress projects. 

Wish me luck, or better yet, want to come sew? 

See you at the machine,

Care


**If you like this quilt, the pattern is called SUPERNOVA and is available in Eileen Wright’s book Twist and Turn Bargello Quilts available here.**